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Grammar

‘in front of’ or ‘opposite’?

We do not use ‘in front of’ to mean ‘across a road/river/room.’ We use ‘opposite’ for that. In American English, ‘across from’ is also used for this purpose.

Example: There’s a shop opposite my house.

‘in front of’ is used often to imply the opposite of ‘behind’ [location].

Example: The woman in front of me in the bank queue was wearing a brown jacket.
The woman behind me in the bank queue was wearing a brown jacket.

Now compare the use of ‘opposite’ and ‘in front of’:
There’s a bus stop in front of the school. [The bus stop is in the same side of the road as the school.]
There’s a bus stop opposite the school. [The bus stop is on the other side of the road from the school.]

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